CONTROL OF FATS, OILS AND GREASE.

This is Sec. 140. of the San Francisco Public Works Code, titled “CONTROL OF FATS, OILS AND GREASE..” It is part of Article 4.1, titled “INDUSTRIAL WASTE.” It contains 7 laws.

a. Sections 140--140.7 of this Article provide requirements for the control of the discharge of fats, oils and grease to the City's sewerage system. Large quantities of fats, oil and grease that are discharged from commercial and residential kitchens contribute to blockages in the City's sewerage system. The resulting clogs in sewer pipes cost the City millions of dollars each year in grease removal and sewer repair costs, and result in the overall degradation of the City's sewer infrastructure.

b. This Article facilitates implementation of a comprehensive pollution prevention program to keep fats, oils and grease out of the City's sewer system, and compliance with the City's current Clean Water Act National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits and the Sanitary Sewer Overflow Waste Discharge Requirements (WDRs) permit, which are issued by the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA).

c. The US EPA promotes the development of fats, oils and grease control programs throughout the country because approximately 40,000 fats, oils and grease-related sanitary sewer overflows that have the potential to contaminate the nation's water bodies occur each year. Nationwide, wastewater utilities have been sued for violations of the Clean Water Act caused by sanitary sewer overflows.

d. The City's aggressive efforts to control fats, oils and grease will enhance its compliance with the Clean Water Act, and also reduce the potential for system back-ups from the combined sewer system.

e. The primary objective of sections 140-140.7 of this Article is to reduce fats, oils and grease discharges from local food service establishments into the City's sewerage system. Food service establishments are required by current regulations to comply with a limit on the amount of total oil and grease they can discharge into City sewers. This discharge limit has not been completely effective in keeping fats, oils and grease out of the sewers. Many food service establishments have grease capturing equipment that is not well maintained or serviced and does little to remove grease from wastewater discharges. Other food service establishments have no grease capturing equipment at all.

f. Sections 140-140.7 of this Article will:

1. Provide standards for the types of grease capturing equipment that must be installed by food service establishments;

2. Provide for the effective long-term use of grease capturing equipment through related operational requirements and prohibitions, and periodic inspections;

3. Increase opportunities for recovering from wastewater discharge lines both food solids (which can be composted) and waste grease (which can be recycled, and may also be able to be converted to biofuel);

4. Aid in preventing sanitary sewer blockages and obstructions from contributions and accumulation of fats, oils and grease in the sanitary sewerage system;

5. Prevent the uncontrolled introduction of fats, oils and grease into the sewage system that will interfere with its operation; and

6. Facilitate City compliance with applicable federal and state laws regarding sewerage system operations.

History

(Added by Ord. 18-11, File No. 101147, App 2/16/2011)

§ 140.1.
APPLICABILITY
§ 140.2.
DEFINITIONS
§ 140.3.
PROHIBITIONS AND LIMITATIONS
§ 140.4.
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
§ 140.5.
GREASE CAPTURING EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS
§ 140.6.
NEW CONSTRUCTION, CHANGES IN OWNERSHIP, AND REMODELING
§ 140.7.
MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS